On a visit to the RSPB’s reserve at Arne, Dorset in June we came across this Nuthatch, who seemed to be washing seeds in a small pool.

Nuthatch at RSPB Arne


Nuthatch at RSPB Arne

Nuthatch at Sculthorpe Moor Reserve


Nuthatch at Sculthorpe Moor Reserve

Nuthatch in nest box


Nuthatch at nest box

Earlier in the year on a visit to the Hawk and Owl Trust’s Sculthorpe Moor Reserve, Norfolk we saw a nest box where a pair were feeding young. You could clearly see that the hole had been reduced in size by plastering it with mud, something these birds do quite often.

Nuthatch at the Sculthorpe Moor feeding station


Nuthatch at the Sculthorpe Moor feeding station

Showing its ability to walk up and down a tree


Showing its ability to walk down a tree

Nuthatch


Nuthatch

Nuthatch Facts

UK conservation status :-              Red,          Amber         Green

Identification :- 

Adult males and females are very alike.

The male has reddish brown markings just under the wing  but these are difficult to make out. They are the only bird species which can walk up and down a tree.

Size :-  14cm      Weight :-    20-25 g     Wingspan :-   22.5-27 cm

Diet :-

Nuts, seeds and Insects.

Distribution :-

Found throughout England, Wales and southern Scotland. Absent from Ireland.

Habitat :-

Mainly in mature woodland, can be seen parkland areas and large gardens near a local area of  woodland. In gardens they can often be attached by feeders

Nesting :-

Nuthatches often use a hole in a tree or wall, or may take over abandoned nests. To reduced the size of the hole they use the technique of plastering it with mud. The nest itself is made from bark chips  and dead leaves. They lay between 6 to 8 white with reddish speckling eggs. and can have 1 – 2 broods per year  Only the female incubates the eggs once they have hatched both parents feed the young. The young fledge  after 23 – 25 days.

Nuthatch