The Moholoholo Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre has become home for many of South Africa’s abandoned or injured wildlife. Since its inception the centre have managed to release over 200 animals back into the wild.  Many however are not able to be released as they are too injured or habituated to humans.

Moholoholo Cheetah


Rehabilitated Cheetah used for educational purposes

Although they have a breeding programme they only breed the animals if there is somewhere for the young to go. Notably the centre has successful reintroduced more than 160 Serval’s into areas where they have become extinct.

One of the Serval's in the breeding programme


One of the Serval’s in the breeding programme

Caracal


Caracal

The small museum was excellent but very sobering and upsetting as it had information about the animals and what they had experienced.

Carol feeding Vulture


Carol feeding Vulture

At the Centre 

Each member of the group had the opportunity to stroke a Cheetah and hold and feed a Vulture. We thought this might be the closest we would ever get to a Cheetah, not really how we wanted to see one. We were able to enter the vulture  and eagle enclosure to get closer to them.  There were Black, Martial, Crowned, Fish, Snake, Tawny and Bateleur eagles, many of  these birds had flown into power lines. 

African Harrier Hawk


African Harrier Hawk

Black Eagle


Black Eagle

African Fish Eagle


African Fish Eagle

Tawny Eagle


Tawny Eagle

Standing next to these eagles, without any cage made you realise how large and imperious they are. Their eyes, talons and beaks are amazing to see close to.

 

Lappet faced Vulture


Lappet faced Vulture

White-backed Vulture


White-backed Vulture

The vultures we discovered were sponsored by Banham Zoo in Norfolk in the UK. a local zoo to us at home. We saw Caped, Lappet Faced, White Headed, Griffon and Hooded vultures.

White headed Vulture


White headed Vulture

The star of the centre was Stoffel  the honey badger, who has been much filmed for TV because of his ability to escape from enclosures. Although the centre was very interesting and did good work rehabilitating and releasing animals we prefer to see them in the wild.

 Stoeffel the Honey Badger


Stoeffel the Honey Badger